My Care journey

A recovery guide for you and your family

My Care Journey provides diagnosis-specific information to help you understand what to expect during your stay, learn more about your diagnosis and explore ways to manage your health after you are discharged.

Please select your diagnosis from the following list:

CHRONIC OBSTRUCTIVE PULMONARY DISEASE (COPD)

Recovery Guide:

The COPD Recovery Guide is a day-to-day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to reduce your symptoms, teach you about COPD, and develop a plan to manage your condition safely after you are discharged.

This information is available in the following languages:

My Diagnosis

Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) includes two major lung diseases - emphysema and chronic bronchitis - and is primarily caused by smoking. Tobacco smoke narrows the air passages and causes chronic swelling in the lungs, making breathing difficult. Learn more about your diagnosis and how to manage your health at The Ontario Lung Association or connect with the BreathWorks Lung Health Information online or phone 1-866-717-COPD (2673).

Managing my Condition

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage.

Other community helpful resources:

CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE (CHF)

Recovery Guide 

The CHF recovery guide is a day to day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to help you feel better and teach you how to manage your condition safely at home.

This information is available in the following languages: 

The expected hospital stay for patients with Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) is 6 days. You may be ready for discharge sooner depending on your condition. If you have any questions throughout your journey, ask! Your care team will give you a book called “Living With Heart Failure”. This has additional information to help with your recovery. Book Online.

My Diagnosis

Heart failure (HF) is a condition that develops after the heart becomes damaged or weakened. HF occurs when the pumping action of your heart is not strong enough to move blood around, especially during increased activity or under stress.

These abnormalities in heart function can cause fluid to back up in your lungs and in other parts of your body such as your ankles. The congestion in your lungs and lack of oxygen may make you feel tired and short of breath.

Learn more about your diagnosis and how to manage your health at the Heart and Stroke or the Ted Rogers Center for Heart Research.

Managing My Condition

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage.

Other Resources:  

HEMORRHAGIC STROKE

Recovery Guide

The Hemorrhagic stroke recovery guide is a day to day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to help you feel better and prepare you for a safe transition when you leave the hospital.

This information is also available in the following languages:

The expected hospital stay for patients with Hemorrhagic Stroke is 7 days. You may be ready for discharge sooner depending on your condition. If you have any questions throughout your journey, ask! Your care team will give you a book called “Your Stroke Journey: A guide for people living with stroke”. This has additional information to help with your recovery. Book online.

My Diagnosis

A hemorrhagic stroke occurs when a blood vessel in the brain breaks open. Blood spills into or around the brain and creates swelling and pressure. This damages cells and tissue in the brain. A hemorrhagic stroke is often the result of uncontrolled high blood pressure.

Learn more about your diagnosis and how to manage your health at the Heart and Stroke Website.

Managing My Condition

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage.

There are other community resources that can help you:

HIP FRACTURE

Recovery Guide

The Recovery Guide is a day to day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to repair your broken hip, manage your pain and get you moving before you leave the hospital.

This information is also available in the following languages:

The expected hospital stay for patients with a Hip Fracture is 7 days. You may be ready for discharge sooner depending on your condition. If you have any questions throughout your journey, ask!

In hospital, you may be instructed to follow Hip Fracture Precautions and review Signs and Symptoms of Infection.

My Diagnosis

A fractured hip is a partial or complete break in the upper thigh bone. You’ll usually feel pain there or deep within the groin. That’s where the hip joint is located. If the hip is fractured, the surrounding structures are likely damaged too.

To fix the break, surgeons can use screws, plates and/or nails. These hold the bones together while they heal. Sometimes your surgeon may completely replace the parts of the hip joint with artificial parts. That’s called arthroplasty.

Learn more about your diagnosis and how to manage your health at the Canadian Orthopaedic Foundation including the Patient Booklet.

Managing My Condition

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage

There are other community resources that can help you:

 

HIP REPLACEMENT

Recovery Guide

The Recovery Guide is a day to day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to manage your pain and get you moving before you leave the hospital.

This information is also available in the following languages:

The expected hospital stay for patients after a Hip Replacement is up to 3 days after your surgery. You may be ready for discharge sooner depending on your condition. If you have any questions throughout your journey, ask! Your care team will give you a booklet called “TOTAL HIP REPLACEMENT ARTHROPLASTY: A Guide for Patients”. This has additional information to help with your recovery.  Booklet online.

My Diagnosis:

During a hip replacement (also called total hip arthroplasty), your doctor surgically removes your hip joint and replaces it with artificial parts, often made from metal and plastic components. The procedure should relieve a painful hip joint, making walking easier.

Managing My Condition:

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage.

There are other community resources that can help you:

 

ISCHEMIC STROKE AND TIA

Recovery Guide

The Recovery Guide is a day to day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to help you feel better and prepare you for a safe transition when you leave the hospital.

This information is also available in the following languages:

The expected hospital stay for a patient is 5 days for an Ischemic Stroke, and 3 days for a TIA. You may be ready for discharge sooner depending on your condition. If you have any questions throughout your journey, ask!

Your care team will give you a book called “Your Stroke Journey: A guide for people living with stroke”. This has additional information to help with your recovery. Book online.

My Diagnosis

A stroke happens when blood stops flowing to any part of your brain, damaging brain cells. The effects of a stroke depend on the part of the brain that was damaged and the amount of damage done.

  • An ischemic stroke is caused by a blockage or clot in a blood vessel in your brain.
  • A Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA), sometimes called a mini-stroke, is caused by a smaller clot that briefly blocks a blood vessel. During a TIA, stroke symptoms last less than 24 hours before disappearing. While TIAs generally do not cause permanent brain damage, they are a serious warning sign that a stroke may happen in the future, and should not be ignored. Depending on how quickly your symptoms resolve, your hospital stay may be shorter than if you had an ischemic stroke.
Learn more about your diagnosis and how to manage your health at the Heart and Stroke Website.

Managing My Condition:

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage.

There are other community resources that can help you:

KNEE ARTHROSCOPY

Recovery Guide

The Recovery Guide is a day to day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to manage your pain and get you moving before you leave the hospital.

This information is also available in the following languages:

Knee Arthroscopy is an outpatient procedure, so you will go home the same day as your procedure.  If you have any questions throughout your journey, ask!

My Diagnosis

During a knee arthroscopy (also called a knee scope) your doctor will make a very small incision (cut) and use a tiny camera — called an arthroscope — to view the inside of your knee joint on a television screen. The surgeon can then investigate any problems with the knee and, if possible, correct the problem.

Managing My Condition:

You will be provided with a prescription for rehab services in the community with your discharge instructions. 

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage. 

There are other community resources that can help you:

 

 

KNEE REPLACEMENT

Recovery Guide

The Recovery Guide is a day to day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to manage your pain and get you moving before you leave the hospital.

This information is also available in the following languages:

The expected hospital stay for patients after a Knee Replacement is up to 2 days after your surgery. You may be ready for discharge sooner depending on your condition. If you have any questions throughout your journey, ask!

Your care team will give you a booklet called “TOTAL KNEE REPLACEMENT ARTHROPLASTY: A Guide for Patients”. This has additional information to help with your recovery. Booklet online

My Diagnosis 

During a knee replacement (also called total knee arthroplasty), your doctor surgically removes your knee joint and replaces it with artificial parts, often made from metal and plastic components. The procedure should relieve a painful knee joint, making walking easier. 

Managing My Condition: 

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage.

There are other community resources that can help you:

PNEUMONIA

Recovery Guide

The Recovery Guide is a day to day guide of what to expect while you are in the hospital. While you are here, we will work together to clear the infection in your lungs and reduce your symptoms so you feel better.

This information is also available in the following languages:

The expected hospital stay for patients with Pneumonia is 6 days. You may be ready for discharge sooner depending on your condition. If you have any questions throughout your journey, ask!.

My Diagnosis 

Pneumonia is swelling (inflammation) of one or both lungs that is usually caused by an infection. Many different germs can cause pneumonia, including bacteria, viruses, and fungi. When you breathe in these germs, they can settle in the air sacs of your lungs. Deep in your lungs, the germs may grow and overcome your body's normal defences.

As you work harder to breathe and give your body oxygen, you can feel short of breath. The swelling also causes many of the other symptoms of pneumonia like cough, fever, and chest pain.Learn more about your diagnosis and how to manage your health at the Ontario Lung Association

Managing My Condition:

Make sure you have a family doctor or primary care provider. They can help you manage your condition and connect you with the right resources. If you do not have a family doctor, please contact Health Care Connect by calling 1-800-445-1822 or visit their webpage.

There are other community resources that can help you:

My Care Journey App

You can also download the free WRH My Care Journey App from the App Store or Google Play for additional information to help you understand what to expect while you are in the hospital and next steps.


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