Windsor Regional Internet Site

Medicine Program Patient and Family Information


Welcome to Windsor Regional Hospital and the Inpatient Medical Unit. This pamphlet has been designed to assist and prepare you for what you can expect during your hospital stay as well as for when you go home. Keep in mind this is only a guideline. Your individual needs will be determined with your input and by your physician and the staff who will be caring for you. Any questions you may have regarding these guidelines or any aspect of your care should be directed to your doctor or the staff caring for you.

You likely came to us from the emergency department. Now that you are on an inpatient unit, you may find that you are more comfortable being in a bed, having routine meal times, a quieter environment and being able to have your family visit. If you have any questions or concerns during your stay please let us know so that we can help.

Why have I been admitted to the hospital?

Sometimes when you come to the hospital you may have symptoms and signs that may be caused by a number of diseases or disorders. From the time you entered the emergency department you probably have provided quite a lot of information to the doctors and other healthcare providers to assist them in determining what your specific diagnosis is. You may also have had some tests done such as lab work, x-rays or ultrasounds to name a few. Sometimes results from these tests may not tell us everything that we need to know and further tests may be ordered. Sometimes results from these tests may help the doctor to diagnose very quickly what your illness is. Whatever the case may be, it is very important for you to understand what we are doing and why we are doing it. Sometimes we may not have clear answers for you but we will attempt to provide you with all of the information that we do have at that time and what the plans may be for any further investigation that is required. Once a diagnosis is made your doctor will discuss it with you. If you have any questions regarding this please feel free to ask your doctor at that time.

If there are questions that arise following that discussion after the doctor leaves, please ask one of your healthcare providers such as your nurse. Your nurse can help to explain any information that the doctor has provided you with, and help teach you about your illness, including any medications or treatments that are prescribed.

How do I get the information that I need?

Just ask. Ask your nurse, your doctor, your social worker, your respiratory therapist or any other health care provider involved with your care. We will provide you with answers to your questions. We have many resources available in the hospital that we can give you including pamphlets, booklets and special nurse educators that we can call when needed. We can also discuss with you resources available in the community for after you are discharged.

If you are having difficulty communicating with your healthcare provider please let the charge nurse, program manager or clinical practice manager know. We are here to help you and can help to ensure that you have the information you require, to feel that you are part of your treatment and have input into your plan of care. If you or your family would like to have a special meeting or discussion regarding your plan of care and any specific needs that you may have, please contact the charge nurse, program manager, or clinical practice manager. We will be happy to arrange this for you and ensure that you are actively involved in planning your care.

How does my family get the information that they need?

Sometimes it is difficult for family members to be here when your doctor comes to see you. If your family has questions for the doctor or would like to discuss any aspects of your care, ask your nurse to help to arrange this. We can help to set up alternatives, such as a specific meeting time, or phone calls that can help.

If I am feeling anxious, scared or require emotional support who do I talk to?

If you have fears or require support from us please let us know. We are here to help you. We have many different health care providers available to assist you. Depending on your specific needs our nurses, doctors and other healthcare providers can help. We can also contact pastoral care for spiritual and emotional support, social workers, mental health nurses, and other specialists that can assist you based on your needs and wants.

When will I be ready to go home?

In general you will be ready to go home when:

  • You have not had a fever for 24 hours
  • You are able to eat and drink adequate amounts.
  • Your pulse, respiratory rate and blood pressure are stable.
  • Your blood tests are within normal range.
  • Any x-rays or ultrasounds ordered are normal.
  • Your discharge plans are in place.
  • Your physician decides that you are ready for discharge.

Depending upon the reason for your admission, you may be discharged home on medications or be booked for further testing. Your nurse and doctor will provide you with information about any further tests or any medications that may be prescribed. Please ask any questions that you have and we will be happy to answer them for you.

If you require further follow up in the community we can help to set up referrals for you.

How do I know what danger signals to watch for?

When a diagnosis has been made your nurse and doctor can explain to you specific things to watch for. In general if you experience pain, shortness of breath, dizziness, any bleeding, a fever, have green or bloody sputum, or any other symptom that causes you concern you should notify your nurse or doctor immediately. After you go home if you experience these symptoms contact your family doctor. If it is an emergency you should go to the nearest emergency department.

How do I know what diet I should be on after I go home?

When a diagnosis has been made that requires a special diet, your nurse, doctor and clinical dietitian can discuss with you any specific needs that you may have in hospital and after discharge. If you require special diet assistance after discharge community referrals and support will be arranged for you. Unless you have been told otherwise, you usually have resumed a normal diet before you are discharged and may resume your normal diet at home as tolerated. If you are unable to eat or drink adequate amounts after you go home, you should contact your family doctor.

How do I know when I can resume my normal activities?

When a diagnosis has been made that may affect your activities, your nurse, doctor, respiratory therapist and physiotherapist can discuss with you any specific activity needs that you may have in hospital and after discharge. If you require special activity assistance after discharge community referrals, equipment and support will be arranged for you. Unless you have been told otherwise, you usually have resumed an almost normal activity level before you are discharged and may resume your normal activity at home as tolerated. If you are concerned about specific activities such as when to return to work you should ask your healthcare provider prior to leaving the hospital. If you are having difficulty performing your normal activities after you go home you should contact your family doctor.
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Program Manager Medical Unit 1 Kelly Markham 254-5577 ext. 52427 
Clinical Practice Manager Medical Unit 1 Jeanette Belleperche 254-5577 ext. 52527
Charge Nurse . 254-5577 ext. 55561
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Program Manager Medical Unit 2 Irene Vermey 254-5577 ext. 52290
Clinical Practice Manager Medical Unit 2 Diane Hernandez 254-5577 ext. 52718
Charge Nurse . 254-5577 ext. 55551
Patient Representative Robin Williams 254-5577 ext. 52317

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